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Odysii Addresses New Calorie Data Legislation for Quick Service Restaurants with Suggestive Selling- Enabled Point-of-Sale Systems
 
 
Recent federal health care legislation calls for the nation’s quick service restaurants (QSRs) to place calorie information on their menus and drive-thru signs. According to Odysii, the world leader in software solutions for targeted suggestive selling, advanced point-of-sale displays with suggestive-selling systems can provide QSRs with a mechanism to meet the requirements of the new law in a cost-effective manner, while displaying calorie-conscious, complementary up-sell menu items that promote a healthy-choice alternative.
The new national policy requires restaurant chains with 20 or more outlets to disclose calorie counts on their food items in relation to the amount of calories a healthy person should eat in a day. Advanced point-of-sale displays with suggestive selling systems add a great deal of flexibility to a QSR’s operations by saving valuable real estate on existing printed menus, menu boards and/or drive thrus; eliminating printing costs of posting calorie information; and enabling real-time changes to healthy-choice up-sell recommendations for customers.
“As the industry adjusts to the new law, point-of-sales displays with self-learning suggestive-selling systems based on business rules can promote a positive customer experience by intelligently adjusting recommended up-sell items based on calorie-count information and prior customer purchase decisions,” said Elad Halperin, vice president of global marketing at Odysii. “QSRs can get as sophisticated as they want with ‘mixing and matching’ their health-oriented menu options and actually can turn recommended nutritional up-sells into a competitive differentiator.”
While the need to display calorie information may be years away as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) deliberates specific regulations, QSRs can increase brand awareness now by proactively implementing advanced point-of-sales displays with suggestive-selling systems to begin the collection of customer-purchase data that ultimately will lead to more informed up-sell recommendations.
Halperin states that software-based systems are less costly to update and have the necessary flexibility to accommodate changes in corporate policies and regulations. “Obviously, the government is concerned with the health of its citizens, which has a direct correlation to the costs of the healthcare industry, and -- if there are additional requirements that are imposed on QSRs in the future -- these systems will be capable of quick and cost-effective modifications,” said Halperin.
Odysii's solution uses individual, customer-facing screens at the point of sale to display product offerings using highly attractive visuals of deals and promotions. Unlike print advertizing, posters or even digital signage with repeating loops, targeted messages provide recommendations that are based on business rules and real time analysis of transactions combined with supporting data for a better, more relevant match.
 
“QSRs can get as sophisticated as they want with ‘mixing and matching’ their health-oriented menu options and actually can turn recommended nutritional up-sells into a competitive differentiator.”